Low Back Pain in Athletes in a BioPsychoSocial approach

Quotes :

Main ideas:
– Environments in which the injury happens may alter perception of the injury threat (stressfull environments -> poorer outcomes);
– Central nervous system, due to persistent input (C-fibers mainly) increases its sensitivity over time -> Therefore the original injury may often have healed but athlete’s LBP remains;_
_- Nociception ≠ pain. Nociception is neither sufficient nor necessary for the pain experience. Pain is therefore better defined as a conscious decision by the brain to defend the athlete from the perceived threat of the injury;
– Nociception may be modulated by beliefs, suffering, pain escape behaviors etc.;
– Athletes dealing with LBP deal with the unknown, including the time injury takes to heal, return to sport, career and income etc._

Recent neuroscience research suggests that clinicians involved in the management of athletes with LBP should not reduce their approach only to tissue injury and embrace a biopsychosocial approach. > From: Puentedura & Louw, Phys Ther Sport 13 (2012) 123-133. All rights reserved to Elsevier Ltd.

#MT #Sportsphysiotherapy  

Reshared post from +Anatomy & Physiotherapy

Neuroscience by Juncal Roman, MSc:

Low back pain (LBP) is common in athletes and is mainly managed through a biomedical approach; which suggests that treating pathology will resolve the symptoms. However, many athletes with LBP will not recover and may continue sports despite pain, thus limiting participation. This article reviews the biopsychosocial approach (Weiner 2008), and presents information on the neurobiology of the athlete’s pain experience.

Main ideas:
– Environments in which the injury happens may alter perception of the injury threat (stressfull environments -> poorer outcomes);
– Central nervous system, due to persistent input (C-fibers mainly) increases its sensitivity over time -> Therefore the original injury may often have healed but athlete’s LBP remains;
– Nociception ≠ pain. Nociception is neither sufficient nor necessary for the pain experience. Pain is therefore better defined as a conscious decision by the brain to defend the athlete from the perceived threat of the injury;
– Nociception may be modulated by beliefs, suffering, pain escape behaviors etc.;
– Athletes dealing with LBP deal with the unknown, including the time injury takes to heal, return to sport, career and income etc.

Recent neuroscience research suggests that clinicians involved in the management of athletes with LBP should not reduce their approach only to tissue injury and embrace a biopsychosocial approach. > From: Puentedura & Louw, Phys Ther Sport 13 (2012) 123-133. All rights reserved to Elsevier Ltd.

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